Archive for Teaching Resources

Action Plan Template

Submitted by: Margaret Potter

Profession: Education

Resource Type: Document Template

Category: All Health Professionals

The resource

Learner Action Plan Template

Description

When an issue or problem is identified it is important to develop an Action Plan in consultation with the learner.  The template provided can help both document and guide the process for both the learner and their supervisor.

Recommendation

The template can be of value to use with both undergraduate and postgraduate learners at any level and across all disciplines.

 

Giving honest feedback: Why do many find this so hard?

You have called a meeting with a challenging student or colleague you supervise to provide them with feedback.  What you have to say affirms acceptable performance in direct patient/client care, but there are areas of concern including teamwork and communication skills.  You hope they will hear you out and take the feedback on board, but your gut feeling tells you otherwise.  You want to give honest feedback while maintaining the quality of your existing relationship, but feel that will be impossible so you dread the encounter.

I’m sure we’ve all been in a similar situation.  It can be difficult to confidently deliver a clear and cohesive feedback message when performance is sub-par, particularly when your input is refuted.  So, what can you do to improve your capacity to provide honest feedback in difficult situations?

  1. Clearly define the boundaries of your professional working relationship from the outset as this can help you avoid misunderstandings regarding roles and expectations1.
  2. Use a feedback model2-3 that requires the recipient to reflect on their performance, so they have to do some work and make this the starting point for your discussion.
  3. Write down key elements of your feedback with specific examples gleaned from your own experience and that of others (if available) so the message remains clear and consistent even if the interaction becomes challenging.
  4. Mentally and physically rehearse your approach as this can build your confidence.
  5. Have a plan to deal with a worst case scenario (e.g., threatening behaviour, walk out) and seek to debrief with an appropriate person if this occurs.
  6. Schedule the meeting time when you have the energy and focus to be at your best (e.g., earlier in the day rather than last thing).
  7. Ensure the person you are meeting is clear about the purpose of the meeting and anything they need to prepare.
  8. The meeting should be interactive, but you will need to manage time and input so clearly state how the session will be run and stick to it.
  9. Recognise that positive feedback feels good, but we learn more from our mistakes so an honest and empathetic focus on areas and actions for improvement will be most helpful.
  10.  Maintain calmness and composure, so you are an appropriate role model  at all times.

 

References

  1. Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency. National Boards [Internet]. [updated 2012 Aug 13; cited 2012 Dec 3] Available from: http://www.ahpra.gov.au/
  2. Pendleton D, Scofield T, Tate P, Havelock P. The consultation: an approach to learning and teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1984.
  3. Silverman JD, Kurtz SM, Draper J. The Calgary-Cambridge approach to communication skills teaching. Agenda-led, outcome-based analysis of the consultation. Educ Gen Pract 1996;7: 288-99.

Cases Database

Submitted by: Margaret Potter
Profession: Education
Resource Type: Web address
Category: Clinical Teaching
Designed for: Medicine

The resource

http://www.casesdatabase.com

Description

This database is provided by BioMed Central (UK) and provides access to case presentation summaries from across the lifespan, a range of ethnicities and that cover a large number of subject areas, conditions and symptoms.

Following your online search you will have free access to a case summary, but for full details of a case presentation fees apply.

Recommendation

A useful source of information about specific cases.

References

 

Using Skype in Clinical Teaching

With increasing need to work with students in different locations, web conferencing can be an excellent teaching and learning tool.

Web conferencing tools provide an easy, cost-effective way to communicate with students and offer an alternative to phone and email communication. They provide the added advantage of a ‘face-to-face’ element that allows the use of non-verbal communication techniques.

The following article provides a range of strategies and is a useful resource:

Using Skype in Clinical Education, Radiologic Technology (2011), Adams L.

 

 

Conflict Resolution Role Play

Submitted by: Margaret Potter
Profession: Education
Resource Type: Role Play
Category: Conflict resolution
Designed for: All health professionals

The resource

Health Professional Conflict Resolution Role Play

Description

This role play is designed to practice a potentially difficult interaction that might occur between any staff member and their supervisor/line manager, where their different perceptions make the likelihood of conflict moderate-high.

The role play is generic in nature and involves a health professional who is busy, works long hours in a large hospital and often ends up bringing work issues home.  This has resulted in lack of work-life balance and growing resentment, so he/she has arranged to meet their supervisor/line manager to discuss how they feel and to hopefully assert their views.

The supervisor/line manager is a workaholic and expects all of their staff to work as they do (ie arrive early and work late to get the job done).  He/she believes this is a reasonable expectation for any committed health professional.

Recommendation

Dealing with potential conflict is difficult so practice via role play can be useful.

References

This is an original resource developed by Margaret Potter.

Psychology of Sport Injury Case Studies

Submitted by: Margaret Potter
Profession: Physiotherapy
Resource Type: Case Studies
Category: Clinical Teaching
Designed for: Exercise & Sport Science, Physiotherapy

The resource

Psychology of Sport Injury – Four Case Studies

Description

This collection of case studies describe four individuals who sustain a sport-related injury which is likely to, or has had some level of psychological impact on their rehabilitation.

Individuals who engage with the case studies are asked to outline the rehabilitation strategies, in particular psychological strategies, they would use in each case.

This resource is most likely to benefit health professionals involved in sports medicine, sports psychology and injury rehabilitation roles at undergraduate and/or postgraduate level.

The case studies will help individuals consider how they can adopt an holistic approach to management and result in discussion of the potential psychological (vs physical) impact of injury on rehabilitation and full recovery.

Recommendation

I have found the case studies useful with both undergraduate and postgraduate students.

References

An original resource developed by Margaret Potter.

Promoting Interaction Icebreaker

Submitted by: Margaret Potter
Profession: Education

This activity is ideal as an icebreaker, particularly in groups where individuals are unknown to each other and come into a teaching session/workshop/seminar ‘cold’ i.e.,  with a lack of familiarity and comfort in the setting.

The activity will promote quick interaction and help people to get comfortable and build rapport with one another.

Promoting Interaction – Icebreaker

References

This is an original resource developed by Margaret Potter.

Preventing Burnout

Submitted by: Margaret Potter
Profession: Education
Resource Type: Handout
Category: All categories
Designed for: All health professionals

The resource

Preventing Burnout Resource

Description

With increasing numbers of learners requiring placements in the clinical setting there are greater demands on staff as clinical supervisors, assessors, teachers, mentors etc. while maintaining their clinical and administrative workloads.

This resource is a 1-page handout for health professionals providing some advice/tips on how to prevent burnout.  It discusses self-assessment, self -awareness and self-care and identifies 10 key considerations.

Recommendation

Useful information for health professionals

References

This is an original resource developed by Margaret Potter.

HQ MedEd

Submitted by: Margaret Potter
Profession: Education
Resource Type: Web address
Category: Clinical Teaching
Designed for: Medicine

The resource

http://www.hqmeded.com/

Description

This US medical education website contains case studies from around the world. Clinical teachers may find the site useful when looking for resources to support their teaching.

Recommendation

I came upon this resource by chance and thought it might be useful for clinical teachers and medical education staff.

References

http://www.hqmeded.com/

DISC Exercise

Submitted by: Margaret Potter
Profession: Physiotherapy
Resource Type: Web address
Category: Communication
Designed for: All health professions

The resource

For DISC exercise materials go to: the Conflict Resolution Network website and look for Quick Links topic 3 (Empathy), section A3.1.

Description

This website offers a multitude of free resources to support developing communication skills, in particular, in the area of conflict resolution.

Those involved in clinical supervision roles may find the DISC exercise helpful to develop insight among staff and/or students as it explores different behavioural styles and how they might impact on communication between individuals and within groups.

Recommendation

I have found it to be a useful tool to encourage reflection on the impact of one’s own behaviour on others and vice versa.  The resources has encouraged valuing diversity and helped to improve communication skills of both students and staff alike.

References

http://www.crnhq.org/